South of Siberia: Harbin’s International Ice & Snow Sculpture Festival 哈尔滨国际冰雪节

It was so cold… I couldn’t be bothered to sing my personal rendition of Vanilla Ice’s hit, “Ice Ice Baby”. It’d have been so appropriate.

2000px-China_Heilongjiang_Harbin

Harbin in one night & one day.

 

Beginning of the night… Central Street中央大街

[Russian shops, glazed fruit sticks & harbin sausage 红肠 are good things to find here]

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Middle of the night… Ice & Snow World国际冰雪节

 

 

[290 RMB entry]

The low temperatures will kill your phone battery after about 2 minutes, so either bring a real camera or take advantage of the photographers that will hassle you for a  30 minute photo shoot. [We bargained our photos down to 50rmb for 10 — they’re print copies, btw]

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There are actually 3 parks for the festival:

  1. Ice & Snow World – see at night
  2. Ice Lantern Park – see at night
  3. Sun Island – see in day

 

Late night… Russian disco club俄罗斯酒吧

Dance-off against the students I met at HeiLong University 黑龙大学. Pretty much the spot for foreigners to dance at — good variety of music — hiphop starts around 1am

 

Early morning… Saint Sophia Cathedral 生索菲亞教堂

[20 RMB entry]

All of the writings inside the cathedral are written in Chinese, so unless you can read Chinese, you’re better off taking photos in the main area & admiring beneath the “Last Supper” painting.

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Afternoon… Siberian Tiger Park 东北虎林园🐯

The African lions were in snow. And yes, I know it snows in North Africa, but I feel like these particular lions weren’t from that part. They looked kinda cold. Maybe it was just me. 😦

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And then… Bye bye Harbin! Off to Guilin in Yunan Province, China — mountain climbing — beautiful scenery!

 

 

 

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Visa Runs to Hong Kong are… no more!

Hey! Just a quick update: For those of us with ever-changing visa service needs (i.e., regularly applying for new Tourist visas… while living in China for years), we could simply take a train down South & hop on a ferry to Hong Kong (or simply fly), have an agent process a new visa for us, and within days, we’re back to whatever we’re doing in mainland China.

As of recent months, you can no longer legally get a new visa in Hong Kong. In most cases, you need to go home, and then come back. 🙂

I’ve just gotten back from -18 degrees-Celsius-below-death weather in Harbin for the Harbin International Snow & Ice World Festival — photos & info soon!

Travel, flourish & finesse.